Western Rifle Shooters Association

Do not give in to Evil, but proceed ever more boldly against it

Saturday, December 4, 2010

Vanished


Do you all understand that what the FedGov has done by barring access to Wikileaks here in the US (see also here and here) will be done against all FreeFor sites (Janet the Second will label them "domestic terrorism" sites) in the near future?

I mean, seriously -- do you really think that Google wouldn't do that?

Print and/or download everything you think you will need -- here and everywhere else.

Quickly.

No sh*t.

UPDATE 0045 EST 5 DEC 2010: See also this perspective on the issue.

UPDATE 1355 EST 5 DEC 2010: But see this comment from a sharp mind:

I don't know that the sun is going to rise tomorrow, but...

Access to Wikileaks was not "barred in the US". Rather, their DNS provider dropped them like a live grenade. (But it was still available through plenty of mirror sites.)

Cui bono?

Certainly not Fed.gov. 1) If they had somehow ordered it, the tech company (which like all tech companies probably has ten times the cojones found in the gun rights community) would likely have replied "Come back with a warrant." 2) Anybody at Fed.gov who even knows what a DNS provider is knows that Wikileaks would have picked up another one offshore inside of 24 hours, which would just make Fed.gov look impotent.

Cui bono?

everydns.net (and the servers at Amazon), on the other hand, were the targets of massive negative public sentiment; notice that even the Vanderboeghs of the world are calling for the heads of Manning and Assenge; every script kiddie on the planet who plays Call of Duty is gunning for these guys. So why not wash your hands of the bad PR (and crushing traffic volumes in the middle of the holiday season) by making up some story about Cyber attacks and "Too bad, so sad? Guess you gotta find another host."

Occam's Razor suggests no need for federal involvement at all.

31 Comments:

Blogger Mayberry said...

Yep. It's coming...

December 4, 2010 at 6:21 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

...very quickly kids! Bad things are coming, very quickly.

KPN3%

December 4, 2010 at 7:12 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yep...just tried to access Wikileaks.org through a few different search engines....can't do it.

Tyranny doesn't happen overnight. If the US Government can pressure companies like Google and Amazon to disallow access to Wikileaks, they can do it to Western Rifle Shooters, Sipsey, Gun Rights Examiner or any non-MSM news outlet.

Eventually we'll be left with CNN or FOX for news....giving us the illusion of choice.

Newspeak for everyone.

Those that control the information, control the power.

December 4, 2010 at 7:19 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yeah, it's coming. The world is ending on May 21, in fact. So this Christmas is the last one you'll have to worry about presents. Praise God!

December 4, 2010 at 7:51 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

the method of removal involved deleting access to the database entry for wikileaks.org - the DNS can be bypassed and the site accessed using the IP address of 213.251.145.96

rather than the URL of wikileaks.org

December 4, 2010 at 9:07 PM  
Anonymous Brass said...

"The page is missing or never was written." Yes. That's what the Ministry of Truth is all about. Down the memory hole.

December 4, 2010 at 10:48 PM  
Anonymous Witchwood said...

Don't waste your time printing documents. External storage can be had very cheaply, even into the terabyte range. External HD's are also very small and can be easily hidden.

December 5, 2010 at 12:32 AM  
Blogger sofa said...

'Diaspora' is a distributed P2P private network where separate computers connect to each other directly using secure protocols (PGP), without going through a central server of some sort.

Description
http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/diaspora_project_building_the_anti-facebook.php

Diaspora Website (for non-IE browser)
https://joindiaspora.com/

***

For browsers, consider bypassing ICANN

http://www.unifiedroot.com/en/How-it-Works/Overview-How-it-Works

Promising Safari browser using TLDs
http://www.sundialbrowser.com/en/


other options?
.

December 5, 2010 at 12:42 AM  
Blogger Pat H. said...

That's exactly what will happen.

It's truly amazing to read all of the so-called FreeFor that want to kill Bradley Manning and Julian Assange over this. Look at the post on Manning on Sipsey Street for a typical example.

Really separates the wheat from the chaff.

December 5, 2010 at 1:11 AM  
Blogger Doc Ellis said...

Anon 9.07 pm
not any more. I just failed through Chrome and Safari to get to the site. I suspect the same result through other browsers.

Doc Ellis 124

December 5, 2010 at 3:22 AM  
Anonymous John H. said...

Pat H.

When someone expresses that opinion, the only ethically consistent position is to boot their ass from the team immediately. None of our groups and collective identities will survive the S Hing the F anyway, so might as well get all our infighting out of the way while we can.

December 5, 2010 at 5:39 AM  
Blogger Dennis308 said...

Now is the time to work on other forms of communication,if ya hav'nt already.

What was that Phone Number or Mailing Address ya wanted to send me. Ops to late.

Dennis
III
Texas

December 5, 2010 at 6:46 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Web censorship will be a serious problem. Without a variety of information sources and competing viewpoints to chose from the consumer must decide what he believes from the information available. Of course many of us will believe that the only thing that they find online is simply propaganda and will not believe any of it. It is possible that the escalating lack of information credibility will lead to actions taken based on bad information. I hope not.

December 5, 2010 at 10:16 AM  
Anonymous Justin said...

www.wikileaks.ch

Wikileaks is up and running, fully accesible.

Justin

FedGov: 0
Open Source Insurgency via Wikileaks: 1

December 5, 2010 at 2:14 PM  
Anonymous Concerned Ally said...

"FedGov has done by barring access to Wikileaks here in the US"

That statement is factually incorrect, yet remains unredacted. Why?

The approval of the echo chamber does not matter; it is your opponents whom you must convince of your gravitas, and continuing to assist in the dissemination of counterfactual rumours does not facilitate this in the slightest. Do you think the other side loses one iota of sleep over, say, the nanothermite & FEMA guillotine crowd?

December 5, 2010 at 5:36 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

John H.
Which opinion are you referring to? I'm with Pat H. on this, I want to see more of this gov't transparency they always keep talking about.

0321

December 5, 2010 at 6:06 PM  
Blogger Concerned American said...

Concerned Ally:

Do you know that the FedGov did not request or have a role in the shenanigans re Wikileaks?

I'd be happy to publish a retraction/correction based on hard information.

Please advise.

December 5, 2010 at 6:06 PM  
Blogger Tam said...

I don't know that the sun is going to rise tomorrow, but...

Access to Wikileaks was not "barred in the US". Rather, their DNS provider dropped them like a live grenade. (But it was still available through plenty of mirror sites.)

Cui bono?

Certainly not Fed.gov. 1) If they had somehow ordered it, the tech company (which like all tech companies probably has ten times the cojones found in the gun rights community) would likely have replied "Come back with a warrant." 2) Anybody at Fed.gov who even knows what a DNS provider is knows that Wikileaks would have picked up another one offshore inside of 24 hours, which would just make Fed.gov look impotent.

Cui bono?

everydns.net (and the servers at Amazon), on the other hand, were the targets of massive negative public sentiment; notice that even the Vanderboeghs of the world are calling for the heads of Manning and Assenge; every script kiddie on the planet who plays Call of Duty is gunning for these guys. So why not wash your hands of the bad PR (and crushing traffic volumes in the middle of the holiday season) by making up some story about Cyber attacks and "Too bad, so sad? Guess you gotta find another host."

Occam's Razor suggests no need for federal involvement at all.

December 5, 2010 at 6:44 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

other options?

Yes.

Freenet:

http://freenetproject.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freenet

It's been around longer than Diaspora, is entirely decentralized and (when running in high security mode) is difficult to detect. "Freesites" are relatively easy to install and maintain.

Freenet add-ons include Frost and Freenet Messaging System (FMS) that allow for chat and forum-like services.

Download it now and start running it.

December 5, 2010 at 6:49 PM  
Blogger Vote For David said...

The local news said their DNS server was getting slammed with DDOS attacks. Qui bono: the server is no longer slammed - they do.

December 5, 2010 at 9:37 PM  
Anonymous Justin said...

CA-

I am not saying FedGov had no hand in Wikileaks' problems. I think that most likely this is "unofficial" pressure, an "unofficial" attempt at killing Wikipedia.

It failed.

BTW, I wonder how many patriots who are currently clamoring for Wikileak's demise, would act if their actions hurt a traditional US enemy?

How would they see Wikileaks if the upcoming wargames commences, and Wikileaks continued to provide intel to FreeFor. Just wondering.

Some things you can't change. Success can be measured by how we adapt to utilize the unchangeable.

Justin

December 6, 2010 at 1:03 AM  
Blogger Concerned American said...

Justin: Agree with both points.

Don't see a whole lot of difference between what Assange is doing vis-a-vis State and what the Merry Band is doing re BATFU.

Each is a f**ked-up branch of representative government that has traditionally held itself above accountability.

December 6, 2010 at 1:16 AM  
Blogger Concerned American said...

VFD:

Any mention of from whom those DDOS attacks might have been originating?

In other words, who would benefit from DDOS attacks aimed at the Wikileaks DNS server?

December 6, 2010 at 1:22 AM  
Anonymous Mark Matis said...

For what it's worth, "Law Enforcement", even RETIRED "Law Enforcement" doesn't like being called Thugs with Guns:
http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/another-clark-county-cop-kills-and-walks/#comment-712395
Some of them can get rather testy. Quelle surprise!

December 6, 2010 at 2:00 AM  
Anonymous Defender said...

I look at it this way.
Remember Johnny Hart's comic strip "The Wizard of Id"? A peasant called the Lone Haranguer would pop up, yell "The king is a fink!" and gallop over the horizon.
Now, suppose LH sets up an Internet site telling HOW the king is a fink, how many of the king's men are also finks, and how, when and where and in what way they were finks. Furthermore, other kingdoms' kings are also finks, and here are the details for the browsing.
Of COURSE some subjects in Id will cry "Treason!" "So what if the king IS a fink. He's OUR fink!" "My Id, right or wrong," and all that.
You can't push people to freedom, you can only lead in that direction and hope they follow.

December 6, 2010 at 2:34 AM  
Anonymous Defender said...

Potential presidential candidate Newt (Newt World Order) Gingrich calls WikiLeaks' Assange "an active enemy combatant."
Does that mean Serbian media rules of engagement?
I guess there was some Newt News in those diplomatic cables, maybe?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zl9v_EQt78&feature=player_embedded

December 6, 2010 at 2:45 AM  
Anonymous Defender said...

Columbia University students warned viewing or linking WikiLeaks content could endanger their job prospects, because it would indicate they can't handle confidential material.
PC run amok.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2010/dec/05/columbia-students-wikileaks-cables

December 6, 2010 at 2:53 AM  
Blogger Tam said...

Q: How do you tell the difference between a DoS attack and a really big Slashdotting?

(A: You can't.)

December 6, 2010 at 3:02 AM  
Blogger Concerned American said...

Q: Who knows what, if anything, CyberCommand has been doing on this topic since the Wikileaks story broke?

A: CyberCommand knows....

:-)

December 6, 2010 at 4:45 AM  
Anonymous Defender said...

Payback alert. Because this 50-something unelected official's grandmother was snubbed by the white family she worked for, chil'ren in the 'hood needs free stuff you have to pay for for YOUR children.
My granddaughter is an at-risk child too. She has long blonde hair. What about her, Ms. Clyburn? Will you tell her, as her black nursery school teacher did when black kids cut in line on the playground, "You wait your turn, little white girl"?


http://www.theblaze.com/stories/free-internet-a-civil-right-for-every-nappy-headed-child-fcc-commissioner-clyburn/

December 6, 2010 at 2:21 PM  
Blogger Solaris said...

http://spsolaris.blogspot.com/2010/12/assange-manning-and-why-some-secrets.html

Heh, my response ran a bit long. The pertinent text is below.

"BTW, I wonder how many patriots who are currently clamoring for Wikileak's demise, would act if their actions hurt a traditional US enemy?"

To be blunt? If Assange had taken action against the MME, the North Koreans, the Iranians, the Russians, pretty much anyone we really don't get along with and will probably find ourselves in conflict against? I'd think he was a sleezeball, but at least he's our sleezeball. I find the 'crusading for truth' journalists obnoxious at best. Some things simply are best kept quiet until they can do little harm. Some things need to be out in the open. Characters like Assange rarely know the difference.
You can't draw a moral equivalency between our enemies and us (certain presidential administrations and... hell, pretty much everything in DC notwithstanding).

But then, I'm an active duty soldier. Journalists are pretty much my natural enemy, even moreso than the ones who shoot at me.

Assange, I don't harbor so much ill will against. Charge him with espionage and put him in prison. Let him write a book, make a ton of money off of it. If we can prove someone's been killed because of what he did, then by all means get him with manslaughter or second-degree murder. I don't expect him to be able to see the consequences of his actions, being that he's not military. I hold him in contempt, as he's a trussed-up little puke who thinks he's something special. I do *not* want him assassinated. We are *not* a nation of vigilantes, we are a nation of laws. He should face trial for his actions, not be declared a terrorist and gunned down. If we do that, we prove him right.

So yes, I disagree with those internet commandos lusting for Assange's blood. We were once a principled nation. Doing the right thing, the just thing, with this person will be a sign that there's something of that left.

December 7, 2010 at 8:41 AM  

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